ad astra per alia porci


The Economist – 24/08/07
August 21, 2007, 10:02 am
Filed under: current affairs

The Economist – 24/08/07 Continue reading



The Economist – 17/08/07
August 18, 2007, 8:11 am
Filed under: current affairs

The Economist – 17/08/07 Continue reading



Jim Cramer’s Mad Money
August 11, 2007, 5:10 pm
Filed under: investments/finance/economics

Personal notes from Jim Cramer’s Mad Money Continue reading



The Economist – 10/08/07
August 10, 2007, 7:41 am
Filed under: current affairs

The Economist – 10/08/07 Continue reading



From Wall Street to the Great Wall – How to Invest in China
August 7, 2007, 3:38 pm
Filed under: investments/finance/economics

Personal notes from From Wall Street to the Great Wall – How to Invest in China by Jonathan Worrall and Peter O’Shea Continue reading



the skies have opened and data rains from the blue above
August 6, 2007, 3:53 pm
Filed under: diary, investments/finance/economics

06/08/07

The STI dropped 3.7% today while I was at my inauguration ceremony. I was already feeling a bit uneasy about not being able to check out my portfolio at the start of the week and I rushed home the moment everything was over and done with. A little bit of worry was simmering somewhere in the recesses of my heart throughout the day and I had a hunch that today would be different; my premonitions were justified when I opened my Shareinvestor account to check my portfolio. Most surprisingly bank stocks fell and this might be an indication of changing investor sentiments. Subprime was always a possible banana peel but I never thought it will be so bad that it can affect Asian markets. However there are worries that Singaporean banks own a substantial amount of CDOs and that the subprime debacle will hurt them.

My question is why Chinese stocks listed on the SGX fell, together with a whole bunch of Singaporean counters which have no easily deduced relation with bank stocks. Fundamentals have not changed but prices are falling. Is this the start of a sustained fall? I am quite doubtful.

On a brighter note, I found a fabulous source of economic, financial and business data. Borrowing Jim Cramer’s pet expression, BOOOYAAAAHHH!



Business Times – 06/08/07
August 6, 2007, 11:19 am
Filed under: current affairs

Business Times – 06/08/07

S’pore shares plunge 3.7%

OCBC sees no big impact from CDO exposure

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Capital Ideas Evolving – Peter L. Bernstein
August 5, 2007, 8:28 am
Filed under: investments/finance/economics

Personal notes from Peter L. Bernstein’s Capital Ideas Evolving Continue reading



Jim Cramer’s Real Money
August 4, 2007, 3:15 pm
Filed under: investments/finance/economics

Personal notes from Jim Cramer’s Real Money Continue reading



The Economist – 28/07/07
August 4, 2007, 8:22 am
Filed under: current affairs

The Economist – 28/07/07 Continue reading



Business Times 03/08/07 – Top retailers in Asia
August 3, 2007, 1:37 am
Filed under: current affairs

Business Times 03/08/07 – Top retailers in Singapore and the region

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August blues
August 1, 2007, 3:49 pm
Filed under: diary, investments/finance/economics

01/08/07 Continue reading



China’s slow but sure shift to yuan flexibility – Straits Times 01/08/07
August 1, 2007, 2:10 am
Filed under: current affairs

Succinct article on the yuan, covering the major concerns and points. I have posted the article but I shall summarise the article in point form below:

  • China is seeking to exit the yuan peg through a two-prong approach.
  • China is gradually moving towards a flexible exchange rate, but eschews revaluations.
  • Stability is a priority as opposed to great changes.
  • China’s problem today is of excess liquidity and economic imbalances due to forex buildup.
  • However, China is stronger today in terms of economic resilience. The banking industry is stronger after reform, the labour industry is more robust with industries moving up the value chain and a more efficient private sector after structural changes.
  • The benefits of a cheap yuan has been eroding. The cheap yuan has induced a concentration on exports in the economy and this goes against the government’s plans to boost domestic demand and reduce external risks.
  • The rigid yuan also attracts speculators, betting on its appreciation. The hot money inflow distorts capital allocation, generates excessive liquidity in the domestic financial system, boosts asset-price inflation and risks broader price inflation.

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